Energy & Utilities

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Everyone agrees that investments in the energy sector will play a key role in the future of the local economy and will attract a lot of political discussion. Businesses that best understand the regulatory, political and commercial environments will have a huge advantage.

There can be few areas of business as politically sensitive as the energy and utilities sector, where it’s so vital for businesses and the regulators and politicians to understand each other’s imperatives.
 
On the one hand, the government has a vital role in finding incentives and sparking innovation. On the other, private enterprise is the natural provider of the innovative solutions that will supply the next generation of energy users – and perhaps make the planet greener.
 
Energy transactions are by definition large and important. They are also governed by complex regulations and overlapping schemes of incentives. So clients expect their advisors to remain up to date, work with them to identify the key legal and commercial issues, expend a lot of effort to produce the highest-quality work, and always bear in mind the wider context in which these agreements are being made and their possible long-lasting effects.

Nowhere is this being taken more seriously than in the Nordic region. Finland, for example, has limited wind and hydro and no oil, but has had a rigid plan to build nuclear capacity, whereas politicians elsewhere have seemingly had short-term agendas that may be hard to support going forward. Additionally, a series of clear and innovative political decisions are sparking a number of interesting projects in renewable energy.
 
Many of these are in the areas of biofuel and energy-from-waste – two technologies in which Finnish companies lead the field and in which Roschier is integrally involved. For example, the firm recently completed one of the biggest Greenfield investments in the region – a huge municipal energy-from-waste scheme that will help secure Finland’s energy supplies while reducing its emissions.